Friendly Blog

Everybody wins when kids play fair!

Published over 1 year ago by Alexis Alexander

We often tell kids how important it is to tell the truth. Sometimes, it’s a simple reminder and other times, it involves a gentle (yet loving) threat from Mom or Dad. (Did you wash your hands? Will they smell like soap if I sniff them?! Tell me the truth because I’m going to sniff them!)

Honesty is important, but it’s also a learned skill. Kids test limits and lying is a natural part of that—in fact, it’s an important development milestone! Children who make untrue statements at a young age may actually have superior cognitive abilities than those who haven’t grasped the concept. Essentially, it’s great if your toddler is always truthful, but if you catch him or her telling lies, consider it a sign of intelligence. You’ll want to teach your child about honesty, but you can feel better knowing how extra clever he or she is.

Classic tales like The Boy Who Cried Wolf are a perfect example of how stories can help teach this important life lesson, and proof that these stories stay with us for years to come (after all, who doesn’t know what happened to the boy? Yikes!).

When we weave moral lessons into something engaging, children pay attention. They listen, they remember, and best of all, they want to hear these lessons again and again because they’re having fun. Reading together is a great way to enjoy quality time with your kids. It helps make memories and spark discussion, and it can fill everyone with laughter.

On that note, meet Myrtle the Turtle. She loves to run, but sadly turtles aren’t known for their speed. This doesn’t stop Myrtle from trying to win the big race. The smart young turtle builds some incredible rocket shoes help her run as fast as the fastest animals in the forest. But what happens on race day when Myrtle is faced with cheating her friends? We’ll leave you to find out when you read the story, but trust us: Myrtle makes a decision she can be proud of.

You can purchase 'Myrtle's Big Race' by clicking here. We hope you love it! Our team has included some discussion questions for teachers (and parents!) below. Stay tuned for the answers in our next social post. We thought we'd leave you guessing:)

Questions for Kids:

Who are Myrtles’ two best friends and what animals are they?

What quality do these animals all share?

What do you think the word “genius” means?

Why do you think Myrtle felt like a cheater at the beginning of the race?

Why was Myrtle happy with herself at the end of the race?

Answers will be shared on social, stay tuned!

We often tell kids how important it is to tell the truth. Sometimes, it’s a simple reminder and other times, it involves a gentle (yet loving) threat from Mom or Dad. (Did you wash your hands? Will they smell like soap if I sniff them?! Tell me the truth because I’m going to sniff them!)

Honesty is important, but it’s also a learned skill. Kids test limits and lying is a natural part of that—in fact, it’s an important development milestone! Children who make untrue statements at a young age may actually have superior cognitive abilities than those who haven’t grasped the concept. Essentially, it’s great if your toddler is always truthful, but if you catch him or her telling lies, consider it a sign of intelligence. You’ll want to teach your child about honesty, but you can feel better knowing how extra clever he or she is.

Classic tales like The Boy Who Cried Wolf are a perfect example of how stories can help teach this important life lesson, and proof that these stories stay with us for years to come (after all, who doesn’t know what happened to the boy? Yikes!).

When we weave moral lessons into something engaging, children pay attention. They listen, they remember, and best of all, they want to hear these lessons again and again because they’re having fun. Reading together is a great way to enjoy quality time with your kids. It helps make memories and spark discussion, and it can fill everyone with laughter.

On that note, meet Myrtle the Turtle. She loves to run, but sadly turtles aren’t known for their speed. This doesn’t stop Myrtle from trying to win the big race. The smart young turtle builds some incredible rocket shoes help her run as fast as the fastest animals in the forest. But what happens on race day when Myrtle is faced with cheating her friends? We’ll leave you to find out when you read the story, but trust us: Myrtle makes a decision she can be proud of.

You can purchase 'Myrtle's Big Race' by clicking here. We hope you love it! Our team has included some discussion questions for teachers (and parents!) below. Stay tuned for the answers in our next social post. We thought we'd leave you guessing:)

Questions for Kids:

Who are Myrtles’ two best friends and what animals are they?

What quality do these animals all share?

What do you think the word “genius” means?

Why do you think Myrtle felt like a cheater at the beginning of the race?

Why was Myrtle happy with herself at the end of the race?

Answers will be shared on social, stay tuned!